If you’re tired of the same old women’s fiction stories, you might want to give this one a whirl.9781937178598

At first I didn’t think I was going to like this story. And honestly, for me it did start out kind of slow. But then a tragic accident changed everything for both the main character and the    plot. From there, the story became amazingly creative, unexpectedly so. I really thought I knew where this story was going, but I couldn’t have possibly predicted what came next. I loved all of the life-lessons Gowen incorporated into this novel. I actually found myself taking notes. I don’t want to ruin the book for anyone so I’ll say anymore. Enjoy!

Check it out on: Goodreads & Amazon

 

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It’s been a fun few months with one heartwarming novella after another until we’ve arrive here at the end with Immersed.

Ebook ImmersedLisette Pannebaker speaks five languages and has a brilliant business plan—personal language immersion. Clients can hire her to shadow them and speak all day in any language they need to learn for business or travel—whatever. But there’s a major hitch: she’s far too pretty. Clients with less than honorable intentions sign up just to have Lisette at their side. Solution? A make-under. Way under.

The bad wig, icky makeup and puffy sweaters work like a charm. None of her male clients show her the least bit of interest. Lisette’s totally relieved.

Until…Erik.

Erik Gunnarson is charming, kind, and smart—everything she’s ever looked for. Every day as his tutor is making her fall for him more. Even though he seems to have a secret, and she’s sworn she’d never date a client, Lisette is tempted to shed her disguise—although it could mean jeopardizing her career.

My Review: This story is really fun end to the series. I’ve read a ton of books with a heroine who either doesn’t think she’s pretty and/or miraculously becomes so, but I’ve never read a book about woman who knows she’s pretty but purposefully makes herself ugly in oder to be taken seriously. And hideous Lisette becomes. Seriously, sometimes she was so unfortunate that I found myself cringing. But in the end, the plot was surprisingly unexpected, the writing seamless, and a joy to read. Enjoy :-)

Add Immersed to your Screen Shot 2013-10-12 at 10.25.14 AMlist.

Purchase Immersed: AmazonBarnes & NobleKobo

Pick up the Box Set for $7.99 on Amazon

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Top Ten Signs You Might be Watching Too Much HGTV

To go along with my contribution to the Ripple Effect Romance Series, I came up with a Tens List:

1. You start having dreams involving twins, Jonathan and Drew, from the Property Brothers that you can’t tell your husband and/or mother about.EbookHomeMatters

2. When your kids want to know why they have to wear sunblock at the pool, you tell them it’s because ‘natural light’ is damaging to the skin.

3. In the spring when all your neighbors are having yard sales, you’re having an “outdoor living space” sale.

4. You come home from the mall, and when your husband asks where you’ve been all day, you say, “Out ‘sourcing’ about a half-dozen pair of shoes,” to which he responds, “That’s nice Honey. Glad you didn’t spend any money,” to which you don’t say, “Who said anything about not spending any money?”

5. You’ve begun to truly believe that everything you see on HGTV is as easy as it looks, and thus have cancelled your yearly vacation to Club Med so you can stay home to “reimagine” your master bath into a “spa retreat” you can enjoy year round instead.

6. When your DIY project lands you in the ER with injuries to body parts that are a little awkward to explain, and the doctor asks, “What were you thinking, operating a power tool while wearing only a tank top and shorts?” You say, “Well, I suppose I was thinking that if Nicole Curtis can renovate, and look sexy at the same time, why can’t I?”

7. You begin to seriously consider that quitting your job and selling your home so you can move to a tropical, third-world country where you know no one, and can’t speak the language, in order to open a surf shop, slash, yoga studio, slash, hookah bar is the most brilliant idea you’ve ever come up with.

8. You understand that in order to secure a guest spot on most any HGTV show, you “must have” a love of both “entertaining” and “enjoying a glass of wine,” a desire to live close to “restaurants, bars and shops,” and have at least one dog and/or a variety of other random pets. Children, however, are more or less optional.

9. You’re life has begun to resemble the last five episodes of Renovation Realities and thus you are no longer able to either “entertain” or “enjoy a glass of wine” because you have a house full of DIY projects you’ve started but can’t seem to get finished.

10. You’re constantly looking for ways to work Piėce de rėsistance into regular everyday conversations.

If you are experiencing six or more of these signs and/or have even an inkling of what the aforementioned is even talking about, you might want to delete any and all DIY shows from your DVR, turn off the TV, and pick up a book, or six. 5 out of 5 therapists recommended The Ripple Effects Romance series as a good place to start.

Pick Up Your Copy of Home Matters Here:

Amazon  Barns & Noble  Kobo

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Every now and then I’ll hear a writer—generally an unpublished author—say that plotting is his/her least favorite part about writing a novel. Okay first of all, “novel” and “plot” are nearly synonymous. Without a plot, there is no novel, no story. So technically, if a writer doesn’t like to “plot,” said writer probably shouldn’t be wasting his/her time writing a novel. In my opinion, just because a person enjoys writing doesn’t mean he/she must become a novelist. There are so many other ways one can express his/her self through the written word—columns, editorials, poetry, blogging, etc.

And second, maybe the reason so many writers have a hard time plotting is because we as a society have become too dependent on technology doing our thinking for us. We don’t memorize phone numbers any more because all of our contacts are stored in our cell phones. We don’t have to think about how to spell because Word and even our phones do that for us as well. I’m showing my age here but I remember when telephones still had party-lines and TVs were black and white. *Gasp* Viewers had to actually get up and turn a knob to change channels. (Currently, I don’t even know where the on and off switch is on my TV much less how to change channels without the remote.) And when I started college, students were still using typewriters for term papers and libraries to do research. Ah, I do miss the days of riffling through the card catalog . . .

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I’m very excited to announce that Count Down to Love was chosen as a Whitney Award Finalist!

Click here to view all of the Whitney Award Finalist.

Count Down to Love was also mentioned in an article at Dawning of a Brighter Day.

Check back in May for a list of the winners. Fingers crossed Count Down to Love is among them.

 

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Recently, I received some feedback on my latest novel (Count Down to Love). First, the editor complemented me on my characters and dialogue, which was nice, but then she went on to categorizing me as the kind of author who tends to “tell” instead of “show.” Now I will admit that I did incorporate the occasional flashback and introspective, some of which I agree needs to be reworked, but when did it become a crime to write a novel with a nice balance of dialogue and narration. And it wasn’t as if I didn’t know what I was doing when I wrote the offensive telling. If my dialogue was “enjoyable” and my characters “interesting” then obviously I know how to “show.” I wasn’t suffering from some sort of multiple personality writing disorder that caused my writing style to shift from showing to telling and then back again without my knowledge.

But then if such a disorder did exist maybe psychotherapists could come up with a Cognitive Therapy to treat it? Something like an annoying alarm that sounds whenever an author writes a paragraph containing more than four sentences, followed by a voice reminding the writer that it’s best to dial-down the narration—more people will read the book if the author uses fewer words. The goal of the therapy being that, over time, the author is able to move past the “irrational” idea that good literature is about plot and characterization. And instead, adopt the “rational” idea that the pace in which a reader can sprint to the last page determines the value of the work.

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