A little while back I was lamenting with a fellow writer over my frustration with publishing. I’d finally finished my fourth manuscript, a project that had taken me nearly eighteen months to complete, and had just been rejected by my publisher. My editor had said that the manuscript was too long and too slow and in her words, “not quite ready yet.” And after taking another close look at the manuscript, I had to agree. Then the next day, I received word that I was a finalist for a Whitney Award, which somehow only made things worse.

But then what could I expect. Throughout the time it had taken me to write the latest manuscript my life had taken a few dramatic turns including my husband’s serious motorcycle accent. Also during this time, I’d released three novels that included editing and promotions, one right after the other. With all of that going on it was a miracle, I know, that I was even able to complete a fourth manuscript. And probably explains why I’d overwritten it by approximately 50,000 words. You heard me, 50,000. Yes that’s right, in essence, practically another whole novel. Then after cutting as much as I’d thought I could, I’d sent it to my editor and the rest is, as they say, history.

Consequently, there I was, three novels under my belt, exhausted, rejected and wondering if all my angst was worth it. And my friend, Melina, being encouraging, had said, “But look what all you’ve accomplished. There are thousands of people out there with dreams of being published who would kill to be where you are right now.”

And so then I started  wondering, why is that? Why are there thousands of folks with dreams of being published?






As an unpublished author my dream during those few years between rough draft and publishing contract was to actually see my first novel in print, to share a story that was dear to my heart with the vast community of readers.

As an unpublished author what I didn’t consider was that when the time came to sending my work out into the world of literature some readers just might not feel the same enthusiasm for the story that I did. While some will enjoy reading my work, others might go as far as to not like the book at all. That a few of my last-minute edits might somehow go awry on their way to the final copy. That the cover might say nothing compelling about the story. That the finished product overall might come nowhere near living up to the dream.





The Editing Pit

Last weekend I completed my first real edit for publication (cover art to the left). As soon as I’d received it from my editor I started out by going through and making the minor changes he’d suggested like comas (we all know I’m bad about those) and words to delete, sentences that needed rewording—the usually stuff. All that took a couple of days. Then I decided to print out the manuscript so I could lug it everywhere I went and mark the parts I wanted to change. I thought it would take another day, maybe two before I would be ready to send it back to my editor. But as I got further into the ms I started noticing more and more problem areas in need of my attention.


Well, 2010 is quickly rolling to a bumpy end here at my house. Nevertheless, I hope that this letter finds all my readers safely gliding into the holidays as I

share my own Christmas wishes.

After my illustrious husband hopped on his Victory Eight-ball motorcycle one warm September morning and ended up taking a ride in an ambulance, not once, but twice, I took over managing the store which, consequently, has turned into a permanent gig. So, besides “running” the store (wouldn’t be possible without the sharp gals I have working for me) I’m looking forward to all three of my novels being published in 2011. The first two are due out in March and November and will be available online in both ebook and paperback—the third will hit bookshelves in May or June.





My Best Advice

I have good news!

Cedar Fort Inc has offered to publish my third novel, Who I Am.

After weeks, and weeks, of re-writes to make the manuscript LDS/Christian friendly, I now have a book that is squeaky clean and ready to be published.


If a reader was worried he/she might find a reference to a woman’s breast, or the word breast in any context for that matter, they won’t find it in my book. So too, said reader will not have to endure any casual references to God. No one saying, “Good Lord,” “God Almighty,” not even a, “Thank You Jesus!” Don’t worry about having to skim over any uncomfortable heated scenes either. Anything romantic in this book is lukewarm at best. Like I said . . .